Why Does The Body Attack A Transplanted Organ?

The body’s immune system is responsible for defending the body against foreign substances, including viruses, bacteria, and other pathogens. When a transplanted organ is introduced into the body, the immune system may recognize it as foreign and attempt to attack it. This is known as transplant rejection.

There are two main types of transplant rejection: acute rejection and chronic rejection.

  1. Acute rejection: This type of rejection occurs within the first few months after transplant surgery and is typically more severe. It is caused by the immune system’s reaction to the transplanted organ, which it recognizes as foreign. Acute rejection is more common in organ transplants, such as liver and kidney transplants, and it can be treated with immunosuppressive drugs, which suppress the immune system’s response to the transplanted organ.
  2. Chronic rejection: This type of rejection occurs over a longer period of time, typically several years after transplant surgery. It is caused by the progressive scarring of the transplanted organ, which can lead to its failure. Chronic rejection is more common in tissue transplants, such as heart and lung transplants, and it is difficult to treat.

Transplant rejection can be a serious and potentially life-threatening complication of transplant surgery. It is important for individuals who have received a transplanted organ to follow their healthcare provider’s recommendations for taking immunosuppressive drugs and to report any changes or concerns to their healthcare team.

In conclusion, transplant rejection is the body’s immune system’s reaction to a transplanted organ, which it recognizes as foreign. There are two main types of transplant rejection: acute rejection, which occurs within the first few months after transplant surgery and is typically more severe, and chronic rejection, which occurs over a longer period of time and is caused by the progressive scarring of the transplanted organ. Transplant rejection can be a serious and potentially life-threatening complication of transplant surgery and is treated with immunosuppressive drugs.

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